Friday, August 24, 2012

Hickory in the Washington Park Arboretum

Carya ovata Washington Park Arboretum October 2011

Carya ovata Washington Park Arboretum October 2011

Carya ovata Washington Park Arboretum October 2011
 
Carya ovata Washington Park Arboretum October 2011

I knew nothing about Shagbark Hickory, or Hickories in general, until I came across this small grove in the Washington Park Arboretum.  But that is a wonderful thing about the arboretum.  Any day you look at tags on trees & shrubs, you learn something new.  I photograph the tags, as well as other parts of the plants.  But you could also take a notebook & pencil.  I found Carya ovata quite attractive in bark, form & foliage.  You can find them between Azalea Way & Lake Washington Boulevard, near the ponds.

From Wikipedia:
Carya ovata, the Shagbark Hickory, is common in the eastern US and SE Canada. It is a large deciduous tree growing up to 27 m tall, and will live up to 200 years. Mature Shagbarks are easy to recognize because they have shaggy bark. The nuts are edible with an excellent flavor & can be used as a substitute for Pecan (Carya illinoensis). The genus Carya includes 17–19 species: 5-6 species in Asia, 19-20 in North America. Hickory wood is used for smoking cured meats. Hickory is popular for barbecue in the SE US as Hickory grows abundantly in the region, and adds flavor to the meat. The nuts of some species are palatable, while others are bitter and only suitable for animal feed. Shagbark and Shellbark Hickory, along with Pecan, are regarded by some as the finest nut trees.

1 comment:

LT Expanded said...

Hey Jordan, Stunning pics and interesting reading! Love the colours. LT